Start How old is the earth radiometric dating

How old is the earth radiometric dating

In the early part of the 20th century, scientists still weren’t sure how old Earth is.

As stated previously, carbon dating cannot be used on artifacts over about 50,000 years old.

These artifacts have gone through many carbon-14 half-lives, and the amount of carbon-14 remaining in them is miniscule and very difficult to detect.

But Earth’s layers of rock did not give up the secret of Earth’s age easily. However, from working with layer upon layer of rock laid down on Earth over long time spans, early 20th century scientists came to believe Earth not of atoms of one chemical element into another.

They led to the discovery that certain very heavy elements could decay into lighter elements – such as uranium decaying into lead.

When scientists first began to compare carbon dating data to data from tree rings, they found carbon dating provided "too-young" estimates of artifact age.

Scientists now realize that production of carbon-14 has not been constant over the years, but has changed as the radiation from the sun has fluctuated.

The age of the carbon in the rock is different from that of the carbon in the air and makes carbon dating data for those organisms inaccurate under the assumptions normally used for carbon dating.

This restriction extends to animals that consume seafood in their diet.

Carbon dating cannot be used on most fossils, not only because they are almost always allegedly too old, but also because they rarely contain the original carbon of the organism that has been fossilized.

Also, many fossils are contaminated with carbon from the environment during collection or preservation procedures.

He concluded that Earth was born 20 to 400 million years ago.