Start Dating a widow feelings of being secondary

Dating a widow feelings of being secondary

According to the film's producer Don Hahn, the Beast's spell is not just physical but psychological as well.

Though seemingly aloof, the Beast is not completely apathetic, as he was able to also empathize with Belle and her own misery from his past experiences as a fellow outcast.

If Belle had never arrived at the castle, he would have eventually stopped speaking, walking upright, wearing clothes altogether, and would have gone to live in the woods among the wild animals to fend for himself.

The film's commentary also implied during the wolf attack scene that he was suicidal, or at least did not value his life too strongly, due to the hopelessness of ever breaking the curse.

This was further supported in the Marvel Comics where the Beast, after saving Belle and Chip after they were trapped in a very serious snowstorm, thanked Belle for saving his life, as her presence caused him to realize his own life was not "meaningless" after all and his refusal to defend himself when attacked by the villagers and Gaston, instead taking the attacks with a depressed look on his face waiting for the finishing blow, only counter-attacking when he realized that Belle had returned to him.

Once the Beast begins to care for Belle after rescuing her from a pack of wolves, he changes from brutish and temperamental to becoming more agreeable and gentle.

As the film is based on the traditional fairy tale of the same name, the Beast is based on the corresponding character from that fairy tale.

Cursed by an enchantress because he has no love within his heart, a prince is transformed into a terrible beast.

Then slowly, through her courage and compassion, he begins to discover the secrets of his own heart and learns that even a beast can be loved.