Start Dating history america

Dating history america

Eriksson, who would succeed Erik the Red as chief of the Greenland settlement after his father’s death, never returned to North America, but other Vikings continued to sail west to Vinland for at least the ensuing decade.

As Leif Erikssson Day approaches, the United States commemorates the explorer credited with the first European expedition to North America.

Nearly 500 years before the birth of Christopher Columbus, a band of European sailors left their homeland behind in search of a new world.

Their high-prowed Viking ship sliced through the cobalt waters of the Atlantic Ocean as winds billowed the boat’s enormous single sail.

After traversing unfamiliar waters, the Norsemen aboard the wooden ship spied a new land, dropped anchor and went ashore.

While Columbus is honored with a federal holiday, the man considered to be the leader of the first European expedition to North America has not been totally forgotten on the calendar.

In 1964, President Lyndon Johnson signed a proclamation that declared October 9 to be Leif Eriksson Day in honor of the Viking explorer, his crew and the country’s Nordic-American heritage.

His father, Erik the Red, founded the first European settlement of Greenland after being expelled from Iceland around A. Eriksson converted his mother, who built Greenland’s first Christian church, but not his outlaw father. These Norse stories were spread by word of mouth before becoming recorded in the 12th and 13th centuries.

Icelandic legends called sagas recounted Eriksson’s exploits in the New World around A. Two sagas give differing accounts as to how Eriksson arrived in North America.

Half a millennium before Columbus “discovered” America, those Viking feet may have been the first European ones to ever have touched North American soil. 1000, Eriksson sailed east to his ancestral homeland of Norway.

Exploration was a family business for the expedition’s leader, Leif Eriksson (variations of his last name include Erickson, Ericson, Erikson, Ericsson and Eiriksson). (Erik the Red’s father, himself, had been banished from Norway for committing manslaughter.) Eriksson, who is believed to have been born in Iceland around A. 970, spent his formative years in desolate Greenland. There, King Olaf I Tryggvason converted him to Christianity and charged him with proselytizing the religion to the pagan settlers of Greenland.

The Norsemen then voyaged south to a timber-rich location they called Markland (Forestland), most likely in present-day Labrador, before finally setting up a base camp likely on the northern tip of the island of Newfoundland.