Start Dating silver plate letter dates

Dating silver plate letter dates

Here, often for reasons of security and economy, it was prudent to operate outside the jurisdiction of the metropolitan assay houses of Dublin and Edinburgh.

Some of these ceased hallmarking as early as the Stuart period (the Norwich assay office identified by a crowned lion passant and a crowned rosette shut in 1701), while others such as Chester (three wheat sheaves and a sword) and Glasgow (a tree, bird, bell and fish) were still operating into the post-war era.

Numbers like 10.15, 112, or 11/12 were stamped on the silver to indicate the percentage of pure silver in the metal.

When the American silversmiths were first “discovered” in the early 1900s, most collectors felt that only the eighteenth-century makers were important.

Dublin’s assay office has been operating since the middle of the 17th century and silver is still marked there.

Most British and Irish silver carries a number of stamps indicating not just the standard or purity mark (typically the lion passant) but also the initials of the maker, a date letter and the place of assay.

The head of liberty indicated quality; a date letter, the arms of the city of Baltimore, and the maker’s initials or name were included.

The dating system was discontinued in 1830 when the silversmiths developed another system.

This is a list of American silver marks and solid American silver. Ornate capital letters or the fleur-de-lis were used in France.