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The brothels and their employees must register with the county sheriff and receive regular medical checkups.

The state of Nevada is the only jurisdiction in the United States where prostitution is permitted.

Strictly regulated brothels operate legally in isolated rural areas, away from the majority of Nevada's population.

A state law prohibiting the advertising of brothels in counties which have outlawed prostitution was enacted in 1979.

It was promptly challenged on First Amendment grounds, but in 1981, the Nevada Supreme Court declared it to be constitutional.

As of 2012, only eight of these counties have active brothels, while the other four (Churchill County, Esmeralda County, Eureka County, and Pershing County) no longer do. License fees for brothels range from an annual $100,000 in Storey County to an annual $200,000 in Lander County.

Licensed prostitutes must be at least 21 years old, except in Storey County and Lyon County (where the minimum age is 18).

Brothel owners may be held liable if customers become infected with HIV after a prostitute has tested positive for the virus.

Nevada has laws against engaging in prostitution outside of licensed brothels, against encouraging others to become prostitutes, and against living off the proceeds of a prostitute. District Judge James Mahan voided the state ban on advertising by legal brothels on grounds the state did not offer any compelling interest in support of the policy, but the U. FN#14 In June 2009, then-Nevada Governor Jim Gibbons signed the most stringent punishments nationwide for child prostitution and pandering.

The rest of Nevada's counties are permitted by state law to license brothels, but only eight counties have done so.

As of December 2017, there are 21 brothels in Nevada.

Nevada brothels are restricted from advertising their services in counties where brothel prostitution is illegal, despite the fact that this state law was ruled unconstitutional in 2007. S Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit upheld the state law in March 2010. The Assembly Bill 380, which allows for fines of $500,000 for those convicted of trafficking prostitutes younger than 14 and $100,000 for trafficking prostitutes ages 14 to 17.