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Which ceased to exist at or about the time that George Blumer died in 1867. The vessel's initial owner was 'Gregory & Co.', of Blyth, intended for use, it would appear, in the Baltic & Mediterranean trades.

It would seem that Colonel Robson was the major supplier of timber to the firm & indeed financed it. The company earned a reputation for building fine ships, & for being safe - not a life lost re any of the 40 ships it built in its first 10 years. 98.3 ft long, crew of 9 or 10, signal letters QBHG. The vessel arrived at Onehunga, Auckland, NZ, from Hobart Town, Tasmania, on May 12, 1864, with a varied cargo. 13, 1869, voyage from Melbourne to Sydney, New South Wales.

Luke Blumer's (1) third son was William Blumer (1789/1850) and it is William's son John Blumer (1832/1913) who commenced shipbuilding in Sunderland. From 1876/77, the vessel was registered at Shields. Dixon' became the vessel's owners, also of Shields.

A fine image of John Blumer, dating from perhaps 1890/1900, is at left below. The Mercantile Navy List of 1880 states the owner to be R. The vessel is not listed in the 1887/88 edition of Lloyd's Register, which may mean that the vessel had been lost or broken up but it could also mean that there was a change of vessel name.

Now this page, indeed the whole site, focuses on Sunderland & its shipbuilders. But you should also know that the Blumer family was involved in shipbuilding in nearby Hartlepool. Denis Wederell of New Zealand ('NZ'), indicated in 2001 that Star of Peace traded from Blyth to Lisbon, Portugal & onwards to Central America & Brazil, but visited Australia in 1879.

Luke Blumer (1793/1873) (2), a prominent citizen of Hartlepool indeed, commenced a shipbuilding business entitled 'Luke Blumer & Son' (1) in Hartlepool in 1848 with his son George Blumer (1817/1867). The vessel rescued the crew of a sinking Belgian ship (name not stated) in 1878; an oil painting of scene by Henry Loos (commissioned by the Belgian government), exists; vessel then captained by William Heatley. Data essentially confirmed by Bill Heatley who adds that a voyage to Australia or NZ was 'not typical'.

I should add that the fine New Zealand based 'Miramar' site ('search by shipbuilder' link & type in 'Blumer') indicates the following business names that were also used i) 'Pace, Blumer', ii) 'Haswell & Blumer' & iii) 'J. I am not sure at what periods in time such names were in actual use. Much of above data originated with Mori Flapan of Sydney, Australia (thanks again!

However, the 'Pace' of 'Pace, Blumer' refers to Robert Pace, a shipwright who was foreman for George Booth.

James's three sons were platers & Malcolm himself, later, in the early 1950s, served his own engineering apprenticeship at Doxfords. Two more fine images provided by Malcolm are visible through thumbnails above. Ray Ranns has assembled data on a great many 'Blumer' built vessels.